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should do in the northeast so that those airports today could really be used for longer distance travel. and that we use those that made the most sense which was rail in those corridors. that would garner us our expectation is pretty close to $5 billion in revenue a year, with about a billion plus or minus coming out of that in terms of profit. >> so you cannot do a direct correlation between california's high-speed rail and northeast corridor? they are two completely -- >> not here. excuse me. i don't know if your question is done. we can't, ma i can't draw that conclusion here because you don't have the right data sets. we may have some folks that have an analysis come and i can look at the and get you an answer back spent perfect. thank you. mr. hanna. >> thank you, chairman. hi, how are you. nice to have you here. advisory commission, you're in the process of developing several other reports analyzing the pressure that would be taken off, projected pressure off of airlines, off of roads and what that means to the northeast will that report be done and what we we be able to get out o
. there are variables that will affect that that we cannot control. with the u.s. does and the international financial institutions do is going to matter. morsi cares about with the international community to cares about him. they are sensitive to that because they need outside support to get their economy back on track so there is a point of leverage. if we can use that i might be more optimistic. but in terms of a long-term goal is, it is islam for a reason and they're going to become liberals. all this talk about post islam is unrealistic because we are talking about deeply religious conservative societies where large majorities maybe they don't vote on the basis of sharia but they are sympathetic to public life and they can empower those elements of society to would push them further to the right and that isn't just egypt we see that in other countries where the democracy doesn't always have a moderating effect and they don't have a more islamic egypt and this could be somewhat liberal if not the liberal. >> thank you very much. thank you. this is a fascinating discussion and i appreciate your won
enough time discussing ways to help them assimilate into civilian life. as the son of a u.s. air force veteran who spent 31 years in the air force, i'm acutely aware, as coul kay is, that it t just those that wear the uniform that serve, but their families as well. many returning vets and their families encounter a whole range of social and economic hardships that can be hard to overcome. most notably, the unemployment rate among our returning vets from afghanistan and iraq is significantly higher than for the general population, something i know kay has worked on extensively. she's also worked to get our veterans the medical assistance, the job training and the financial support they need. indeed, i don't know of any senator that's done more to help america's heroes adjust to life after the military. that's just one of the reasons why she will be sorely missed. here's another reason, though: kay has fought time and time again to promote tax relief for hardworking texas families. in thehooin the mid-1990's, shed create the so-called homemaker ira to make sure that stay-at-home moms and
to represent the nation's second largest state in the u.s. senate. kay came to washington ready to work. she established herself early on as a leader on transportation and nasa and as a fighter for lower taxes and smaller, smarter government. kay won a claim as an advocate for science and competitiveness, helped secure bipartisan support for the landmark america competes act, and she became known throughout the state for the close attention she paid to constituents. shortly after her election to the senate, kay began a tradition imitated by many others since of holding weekly constituent meetings over coffee whenever the senate's in session. the groups usually ranged in size from 100-150, and at any given coffee, you might come across families in bermuda shorts, bankers in pinstripes or college football players. over the years, kay has hosted about 50,000 people in her office through these coffees, but her attention to constituent service goes well beyond that. back home, she is one of the few politicians in texas who has actually visited all 254 counties, some of which are home to more catt
students. many of us have talked about this in the past. we have to be more aggressive in dealing with the mental health needs of all the people in our community. and as chairman leahy pointed out, we must discuss the issue about the ready access of individuals to weapons. now, i know there are different views in this congress. i must tell you, i don't understand why we need to allow access to military-style assault weapons and ammunition. i strongly support senator feinstein's effort to reinstate the expired 1994 ban on assault weapons, including a ban on ammunition magazines that hold more than ten rounds. senator durbin has raised a very valid point. we regulate automobiles, we regulate consumer products, we regulate a lot -- as we should for public safety. and we should regulate firearms for public safety reasons. there's no need for assault weapons to be held by the public. in my view, there's no legitimate reason for a civilian to possess a military-style weapon or to have large-capacity ammunition clips. congress should also examine whether we can strengthen our background
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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